Science Uprising: A New Mini-Film Series

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Photo Credit: Discovery Institute

This week, the first short film in a brand new seven-part series entitled Science Uprising was released. This series of edgy, visually stunning videos is designed to challenge the claims of materialist philosophy head-on. (Materialism is the view that the only reality is the material stuff of the cosmos.) The first installment, Reality: Real vs. Material, introduces the central issue and explains how pervasive the “science, therefore materialism” ideology has become in contemporary culture. The forthcoming episodes will cover topics such as mind, DNA, the fine-tuning of the universe, the origin of life, and human evolution, and will expose the failure of materialism to make sense of the world in any intellectually satisfying way. This will be a fantastic series for high school and college classrooms–so much great discussion material!

From Discovery Institute:

Episodes will feature original interviews not only with top Discovery Institute Fellows such as Stephen Meyer and Michael Behe, but also with leading scientists such as renowned research chemist James Tour at Rice University, physicist Frank Tipler at Tulane University, and psychiatrist Jeffrey Schwartz at UCLA, an expert on the neuroplasticity of the brain.

Science Uprising is the brainchild of cinematographer David Arabia and Discovery Institute Senior Fellows John West and Jonathan Witt, and it was created by a network of young professionals in the TV industry who have worked on productions for the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, National Geographic Wild, Animal Planet, FoxNews, and other media outlets. Many of these young filmmakers viewed this project not just as a job, but as a mission. They wanted to use their talents to challenge materialism head-on and expose members of their generation to the overwhelming evidence of purpose in nature. 

The website for the series, www.ScienceUprising.com currently includes the first film as well as supplementary interviews, articles, and a short book list. I’ve read the recommended titles; I would suggest beginning with The Magician’s Twin, an essay collection edited by John West, and follow that with Scientism and Secularism by J.P. Moreland. That will set the stage well for atheist Thomas Nagel’s Mind and Cosmos, a compelling (and surprising) critique of the materialist worldview. When it first came out several years ago, I found the Dembski book to be quite challenging; I should revisit it. You’ll need your big girl/big boy pants for that one. 😉

 

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